Facebook admits another problem: it did not do enough to curb hate messages in Burma

Facebook Admits Another Problem: It Did Not Do Enough To Curb Hate Messages In Burma

The social network has been used in recent years to launch controversial messages against the Rohingyas, a majority Muslim community that has been the victim of an ethnic cleansing campaign.

The US social network Facebook acknowledged that until this year did not do enough to curb hate messages in Burma (Myanmar), which affected mainly the minority Rohinyá, after an internal audit.

This was stated by the head of Product Policy of the company, Alex Warfka, after a report on the impact of the social network on human rights in Burma commissioned to the NGO Business for Social Responsibility (BSR). “The report concludes that, before this year, we did not do enough to prevent our platform from being used to encourage and incite violence in the real world. We agree that we can and should do more, “Warfka said.

Facebook has been used in recent years to launch hate messages against the Rohingya, a Muslim majority community that has been the victim of a campaign of ethnic cleansing and possibly genocide in the west of the country, according to the UN. BSR recommends that Facebook create a “formal governance structure” that oversees the company’s human rights strategy and offers regular updates on the progress made.

The audit also urges the Silicon Valley company to strengthen its user standards and publish specific information about the state of the social network in Burma so that it can be analyzed by the local and international community. Warfka agreed with BSR and stated that in the third quarter of this year Facebook acted against 64,000 contents, of which 63% were identified by the company, when before the majority of complaints about hate content were made by users.

The company already has 99 employees who speak Burmese and will have 100 by the end of the year with the aim of monitoring, with the help of artificial intelligence tools, to fight sectarian hatred messages in the network in Burma. The report also recognizes that misinformation and discourse against minorities also require changes in legislation in Burma, as well as awareness campaigns among the population.

Another obstacle in the country is that it mostly uses the Zawgyi text code, as opposed to the more common and extended Unicode, which makes supervision more difficult. Facebook has been used in recent years to launch hate messages against the Rohingya, a Muslim majority community that has been the victim of a campaign of ethnic cleansing and possibly genocide in the west of the country, according to the UN. Last August, the social network blocked the accounts of the head of the Burmese Armed Forces, Min Aung Hlaing, and of other persons or entities to prevent incitement to hatred and misinformation, mainly related to the Rohingya.

Posted by Steve

The founder of Tech Irons and always believe in the miracle and do happens. Technology, I carry it in my blood. Enthusiast of virtual reality and video games, always ready to follow the progress of what I like.
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